Excellence Driven by Research

Extensive research has shown that mentoring can have profound positive impacts on youth. For example:

Positive community engagement results in increased academic performance, feelings of belongingness, identity development, and self-esteem for high school and college students, while decreasing chances of engaging in negative risk behavior
(Wilson)

Young adults who were at-risk for falling off track but had a mentor are 55% more likely to enroll in college, 78% more likely to volunteer regularly, and 130% more likely to hold leadership positions. However, despite these compelling documented positive impacts of mentoring relationships, 1 in 3 children will grow up without either a formal or informal mentor
(Bruce & Bridgeland, 2014)

Students learn best when they are engaged in a task that is meaningful, challenging (though not overwhelming), and engaging and met with the proper support (or scaffolding) from caring adults
(Vygotsky).

RT seeks to combat the unacceptable 27% 4-year college graduation rate first-generation college students face by empowering and teaching critical life skills to AVID students and the 27% of UVA Facilitators who are first-generation college students.

The Positive Effects of Mentoring

%

More Likely to Enroll in College

%

More Likely to Volunteer

%

More Likely to Hold Leadership Positions

Most High Schoolers Feel Unprepared for College and Careers

  • Amount of High Schoolers Who Wish to Attend College 87%
  • Amount of Students Who Feel Positively About Their College and Career Readiness 45%
  • Number of Secondary Students Who Feel That What They Learn in Class Helps Them Outside of School 48%
  • Only About Half of Secondary Students Enjoy Coming to School 52%

Impact of Social and Emotional Learning

When youth participate in intentional Social Emotional Learning programming over a sustained period of time (one year), they:

  • Have grade point averages that are 11% higher than their peers;
  • Score higher on standardized tests; and
  • Are less likely to engage in high-risk behaviors that interfere with learning such as violence and drug and alcohol use.

Source: KYD Network

Rise Programs are Based off of Cutting-Edge Youth Development and Social Science Theories